That ‘WTF just happened???’ moment.

I haven’t been blogging lately because I got busy. Or lazy. Or both. :lol: But after finishing It’s OK To Be Not OK (the Netflix version of the title, which I am going to adopt for this write-up; the direct translation from the Korean title is Psycho, But It’s OK), I just feel that I have to write about it. Don’t expect a lengthy, romantic prose nor interpretations of symbolism nor anything like that. This is just me in my usual Agent P self, being shallow and all. :razz:

So here it is.

Mini-review: It’s OK To Be Not OK

***I’ll try my best to keep this spoiler-free even if, I think, I’m the last one in my universe to have seen this drama. But just in case, WARNING: There might be SPOILERS.

True confession: I was kinda afraid to watch It’s OK To Be Not OK (IOTBNO). I’ve been looking forward to it, being such a sucker for anything Kim Soo Hyun. However, I’m more of a binge-watcher. I have this thing about waiting for the original run to end – or at the very least, be on its last two episodes – before I start watching because I hate having to wait a week before I know what happens next. I painstakingly avoided looking at posts related to IOTBNO to avoid spoilers. Which is not an easy task, especially when the drama blew up. Nearly everyone on my social media feeds are talking about it, even raving about it as The. Best. K-Drama. EVERRRRR. It became more difficult when even Alden Richards, whom every move I follow religiously, is posting about it.

Eventually, it almost suffered the Meteor Garden Sickness with me. But mine was more of apprehensions rather than the usual, “everyone is watching it and I want to be different” sort of thing. What if I end up getting disappointed or shortchanged? I’m OK if it’s something like DOTS or CLOY which I didn’t mind at all if I ended up not raving about it. This drama has one of my absolute favorite actors on the cast, and is being fanboyed over by another one of my absolute favorite actors. To be disappointed about it would be devastating for me.

But, the other favorite actor, Alden Richards, is raving about it. Alden, who barely had interest in watching Korean dramas even if people are practically pushing him to watch one, is even Tweeting/Instagramming about it. What’s the big deal? So, despite being stumped with work deadlines, I started watching IOTBNO before the last episode was released.

Unlike my usual trend when watching K-dramas that interest me, it took me a week to finish the first 12 episodes. Yes, the work deadlines got in the way, but if I’m engrossed with a K-drama I usually devote a day or two to binge-watch and then just worry about cramming for deadlines later. :razz: (Don’t try this at home, kids. Pawang propesyunal po lamang ang nakakagawa n’on.) And then there’s the problem of my home internet connection acting up for a day or two. Still, I don’t usually let those things get in the way of my eagerness to watch a K-drama. For some reason, I was fine with watching IOTNBO one or two episodes at a time and not on a daily basis. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad nor boring. The pacing was just right, the acting was superb, and Kim Soo Hyun is drop dead gorgeous, I always end up muttering “bakit apaka-pogi mong bata ka?” at every close-up of his face. :dream: I’m just not getting the usual reactions that I see on social media as regards every episode of IOTNBO. To quote them American Idol judges, it’s just alright for me.

This part terrified me. Why didn’t I react the same way as they did? Why am I not shedding tears towards the scenes or episodes which, they said, were surefire tearjerkers? Am I really that dead inside?

Still, it didn’t dampen my interest and continued watching. For three reasons:
(1) The drama’s overall theme of the dark reality behind fairy tales;
(2) It tackles mental health issues, for which I could somewhat relate;
(3) Kim Soo Hyun. Of course.

And then, it happened. The end of Episode 13. The part that made me hit that ‘Pause’ button and yell, “WHAT THE F***?!?!?!?!” in full volume at 1:30 in the morning. :whoa:

After that, I simply could not stop watching. I binge watched until the end and finished just as the sun was rising this morning. It took me a good 30 minutes before I was able to sleep because my adrenaline level was so high, it took a lot of convincing myself to get some zzz’s first in order to stop myself from turning my laptop on and start blogging.

I finally understood what they were saying about this drama’s every scene being essential to the entire story. From Episode 14 thereon, I told myself that I should’ve paid more attention to the first 13. Every little thing was nicely wrapped up in the last three episodes. The writing was brilliant. The direction was brilliant. The ACTING was super-brilliant. I was stunned, amazed, to say the least. I don’t remember ever being floored by a K-drama like this before.

My entire experience watching It’s OK To Be Not OK taught me, first-hand, one of the lessons they tackled here: do not judge quickly without knowing the full story first.

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Just a side note as regards Alden Richards and It’s OK To Be Not OK.

I’m not just saying this because I’m his fan, he’s a fan of IOTBNO, and the drama is super popular: By the middle of Episode 1, I immediately thought that Alden Richards is perfect for the role of Moon Gang Tae. The entire character screams ALDEN RICHARDS. It actually screamed RICHARD REYES FAULKERSON, JR. to me, but I cannot elaborate, lest I be called feeling close or worse, overly delusional. Which, Agent P has always been from as far as the Rain era, so what the heck am I saying? :lmao:

Mind you, I had this thought way before Alden revealed in an interview last Friday that he became interested in IOTBNO because one of the GMA Drama writers recommended it to him and told him that he’s fit for the Moon Gang Tae role. Yes, I’m flexing something for which I have no proof, but remember which blog you’re reading. :glee:

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