Alaala.

This is not a review. I am not qualified to give a review because I was late in tuning in last night and didn’t see the documentary in full.

This is not a political commentary. I try hardest never to deal with anything about politics on this blog because I don’t think I’m intelligent enough to present arguments of the political kind. Also, my day job requires me to be neutral at all times. To save my ass from looking stupid, I stay away from that topic.

I am writing this blog because I want to express my thoughts on the performances of the actors.

Ms Gina Alajar is already a given. I mean, her acting skills are LEGENDARY.

True confession: there was I time when I became a Rocco Nacino fangirl, and that was because I religiously watched his GMA-NPA docu-drama Bayan Ko. For some reason, Rocco is the perfect actor to play political figures.

Bianca Umali. She’s so pretty, she’s so young, and she’s an excellent actress. I love that short footage where Boni Ilagan was telling Bianca about his sister Lina whom she’ll be portraying, and Bianca was listening intently and absorbing every word.

And of course, Alden Richards, whom I’ve always known and admired for his acting skills ever since I saw One True Love. (Yep, contrary to what le bashers are saying, I did not become a fan because he’s cute and I have HD on him. :rolleyes: ) He turned in a performance that’s on a whole new level as an actor. After that, there’s no way that he could go back to being pabebe anymore. He’s too good for that. #myopinion

The documentary, as a whole, was excellently crafted and there were many highlights. But there were two scenes that really made a mark on me: (1) That scene where Boni’s mother visited him at prison, and he was not allowed to get near her so he just unbuckled his pants down and showed her the bruises on his thighs; and (2) the next scene, he saw his sister Lina from a distance, and Lina just threw her fist up in the air to send him her message. In those two scenes, the actors did not utter any lines but were able to send a whole lot of messages across. That’s a Master Class in acting right there.

But more importantly, I commend these actors for having the guts to take on a project with a highly divisive theme. Most especially Alden, who did not let his ‘mainstream’ image hinder his choice to do this documentary and used it instead to educate and inform. This isn’t about politics. It’s about history. And I couldn’t be prouder of this guy and everyone else who are part of this documentary.

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