This is not a review. I am not qualified to give a review because I was late in tuning in last night and didn’t see the documentary in full.

This is not a political commentary. I try hardest never to deal with anything about politics on this blog because I don’t think I’m intelligent enough to present arguments of the political kind. Also, my day job requires me to be neutral at all times. To save my ass from looking stupid, I stay away from that topic.

I am writing this blog because I want to express my thoughts on the performances of the actors.

Ms Gina Alajar is already a given. I mean, her acting skills are LEGENDARY.

True confession: there was I time when I became a Rocco Nacino fangirl, and that was because I religiously watched his GMA-NPA docu-drama Bayan Ko. For some reason, Rocco is the perfect actor to play political figures.

Bianca Umali. She’s so pretty, she’s so young, and she’s an excellent actress. I love that short footage where Boni Ilagan was telling Bianca about his sister Lina whom she’ll be portraying, and Bianca was listening intently and absorbing every word.

And of course, Alden Richards, whom I’ve always known and admired for his acting skills ever since I saw One True Love. (Yep, contrary to what le bashers are saying, I did not become a fan because he’s cute and I have HD on him. :rolleyes: ) He turned in a performance that’s on a whole new level as an actor. After that, there’s no way that he could go back to being pabebe anymore. He’s too good for that. #myopinion

The documentary, as a whole, was excellently crafted and there were many highlights. But there were two scenes that really made a mark on me: (1) That scene where Boni’s mother visited him at prison, and he was not allowed to get near her so he just unbuckled his pants down and showed her the bruises on his thighs; and (2) the next scene, he saw his sister Lina from a distance, and Lina just threw her fist up in the air to send him her message. In those two scenes, the actors did not utter any lines but were able to send a whole lot of messages across. That’s a Master Class in acting right there.

But more importantly, I commend these actors for having the guts to take on a project with a highly divisive theme. Most especially Alden, who did not let his ‘mainstream’ image hinder his choice to do this documentary and used it instead to educate and inform. This isn’t about politics. It’s about history. And I couldn’t be prouder of this guy and everyone else who are part of this documentary.

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Mini-Review: Man To Man

  • First of all, I’d like to thank my good ol’ friend Charity for recommending this drama.  She was raving about our sentimental favorite Park Hae Jin’s performance and let me browse through Episode 1 during an impromptu O-nite with some of my Voltes friends.  I super-liked what I saw and promptly asked for the files but didn’t start on it until a week later, for maximum focus.  :tounge:
  • I can’t remember the last time I did a sleepless-night marathon for a Korean drama.  I did remember almost doing it with Goblin, but work and migraines got in the way that I finished it in several installments.  With Man to Man, I finished it in two installments for two consecutive days, with the second installment finishing at almost 5:00am.  I just couldn’t stop watching it.
  • One reason why it took until early morning for me to finish this drama: there were several instances where I had to pause for a minute or two because the scene affected me so much (in local parlance, hindi ko kinaya).  It’s either I had to stop to swoon at Hae Jin, or because I was laughing too much that I can’t concentrate on the next scene so I had to press ‘pause’.
  • This drama is classified as “action-thriller-melodrama” by Wikipedia, but I don’t know exactly where the ‘melodrama’ part is. :shrug: I do know that the one thing that impressed me with the story is that you won’t know who exactly was the villain until around Episode 14 or so.  You thought you already knew, but you don’t. It has many surprises along the way until the very end.
  • Dare I say it? Despite the many similarities with Descendants Of The Sun (the writer of Man To Man is the second writer of DoTS, after all) I liked this more than DoTS.  I’m talking story- and storytelling-wise.
  • The only thing in favor of DoTS per my tally is the leading lady.  Sorry to any Kim Min Jung fans here, if any, but I really don’t get her.  She’s actually annoying in this drama.
  • Then again, ALL the female characters in Man To Man super-pale in comparison to all the men.  They only acted as decorations or plot machines here for me.  Otherwise, you can take them all out and I’m perfectly fine with it.
  • May I just rave about the men some more?  :drool:  It’s not even because they’re hot men (most of them are old hahaha), although Park Hae Jin is incredibly cute and hot here in a very Song Joong Ki way.  It’s the way the male characters interacted with each other.
  • The sense of humor and sharp with of the creators of this drama are the type that I like.  The random genre switches didn’t look nor feel off at all.  They make viewing more interesting. Of course, there are loopholes and goofs along the way but that’s normal for even the most critically-acclaimed films and TV dramas.
  • As mentioned above, Park Hae Jin is the main reason why I watched this drama.  He is the Voltes team’s sentimental favorite, having met him twice in two of our trips to South Korea.  I started liking him in Family Outing, then I started loving him after we met him the first time at a random office supplies shop in Seoul. It was an ambush meeting and he was on his private time, but he was gracious and kind to us.  My love for him was cemented after he showcased amazing acting chops at My Love From The Star.  Thus, it didn’t came as a surprise that he gave a performance with so much depth and versatility as Agent K.  The only part that surprised me is his physique.  He used to be reed-thin and frail-looking. Now, he’s lean and smokin’ hot. :drool:
  • Random comment coming up:  I read on Wikipedia that GMA-7 already got the rights to air this drama. It seems the network execs like Park Hae Jin? They’ve already aired some of his dramas, ie., My Daughter Seo Young and My Love From The Star.  Once Man To Man starts airing here, I most probably will be taking out my photos with Hae Jin again. :hihihi:
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I’ve been out of touch with anything Korean these days. To be quite honest, I never expected that the one who would push me back towards it is this guy.

A bit of back story: since I’m more in touch with local entertainment these days – Kapuso Network, to be exact – I’ve been hearing a lot about this breakthrough Phil-Kor production called My Korean Jagiya, starring Heart Evangelista-Escudero. The network has been hinting that Heart’s leading man is a Korean idol, and people have been guessing who this idol will be. The two most popular guesses are Lee Joon (I don’t know why?) and Alexander Eusebio (because UKISS, and he’s been here many times before both with the group and as a solo artist). Yesterday, the network has made a formal announcement and yep, it’s him! Alexander Lee (Eusebio)!

Those who have been reading this blog before the Alden era would know that I have been extensively following Xander since the UKISS days. I have a long history with this guy. It is but natural that I will be following his new journey as an actor in a Philippine-made drama. I’m already excited about My Korean Jagiya, and knowing that Xander is the male lead made me anticipate it even more. :thumbup: Congrats, Xander, and welcome back to the Philippines! And advanced Happy Birthday, too!

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  • I’m using the above photo as my featured image, because those three made Goblin such a viewing pleasure. At least, for me. :grin:
  • I don’t remember the last time I actually lost sleep because of a K-drama. While I didn’t exactly do a marathon viewing because work and migraine got in the way :aargh: I know that if I could, I would’ve done it. It’s that engrossing.
  • This is one of those K-dramas where you kinda knew how it would end, but for some reason you want to know exactly how they would end it. You thought you already knew, but na-ah! There’s a twist in there, somewhere. This is what got me hooked for all 16 episodes.
  • I was never a fan of Lee Dong Wook – actually, if you search through all my old entries, you’d find that he’s the subject of one of the biggest rants I’ve ever written on this blog – but I find him to be super-adorable on this drama. :drool2: And at the same time, he delivered some pretty brilliant acting on some of the latter scenes. I won’t specify which is which for the benefit of those who haven’t seen it.
  • It’s kinda weird how Gong Yoo is not your traditional Korean pretty boy leading man, but he’s attractive in a lot of ways. His charisma here reminded us why everyone went gaga over him at Coffee Prince.
  • There were quite a lot of downright laugh-out-loud moments, and you would laugh louder if you’re familiar with the references. Watch out for the movie house scene. :lmao:
  • I share this observation with my niece: Gong Yoo doesn’t exactly nail the sageuk look. :neutral:
  • I’m familiar with the age gap issue that some viewers have with this drama. I didn’t quite mind because Gong Yoo’s character Kim Shin is 900+ years old in the first place, so he’s basically much older no matter how old the leading female character is. :hihihi: I did feel a little grossed out at the ending. :shutup:
  • One big factor that made Goblin work is the chemistry among the cast. They seem to have gotten really close and it radiated through the screen.
  • I absolutely love the OST.
  • I wouldn’t mind seeing Gong Yoo and Lee Dong Wook in another project together.
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    Aftermath: 21st Asian Television Awards
    01 December 2016 – Suntec Convention Center, Singapore

    I have been a blogger for almost 12 years, and a fangirl for about two decades. But never in my wildest dreams will I find myself covering an event of international magnitude, and that opportunity was made possible through Alden Richards.

    A little back story: I actually got to know about Alden’s ATA hosting through Alden himself. (Yes, I will be gloating. :P Bear me with me.) It was on September 20, 2016, when Alden International hosted a dinner/meet-up with him. As soon as I greeted him by the door at Concha’s, he made beso and said, “Ate Pau, Singapore ako uli sa December, host ako sa Asian TV Awards” (Ate Pau, I’ll be coming back to Singapore in December to host the Asian TV Awards). And I was like, “whoa!!!!” :whoa: followed with this thought: so what are you telling me, exactly? :hihihi: Of course, the next immediate thought was that I will do everything in my power to be there. It’s a milestone event in Alden’s career, and I needed to go back to Singapore, anyway, because I wasn’t able to tour much the first time I was there in July. I just never thought that it would be this soon.

    The formal announcement was made about two weeks later, so you could just imagine the amount of effort we had to exert in controlling ourselves not to blab about it in public. :grin:

    This is it! Go, Alden! #AldenAtATA #ATA2016 #21stATA @aldenrichards02 @aldenintl

    A photo posted by Paulette Agent P (@agent_pau) on


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